Archive for 'Precision Agriculture' Category:

soil
By Catherine Joce: Wednesday 20th September, 2017

Circular Economy in Agriculture

Farmers have acted as stewards of natural resources – soil, water, plants, fertilizers, wildlife and so on – for centuries. So circular economy thinking – which encourages business models which keep resources circulating in the economy at their maximum value – should resonate in the agritech sector. Of course the approaches used to keep resources […]

Barley
By Stuart Gilby: Monday 10th April, 2017

Hidden greenhouse gases in crops

I read recently that 50% of a loaf of bread’s carbon dioxide (CO2) footprint was due to the amount of fertiliser used in producing the wheat needed to make the loaf. It’s not surprising when you realise that 1% of global energy generated each year is used by a single chemical process – the Haber-Bosch […]

Smart soil sensor
By Niall Mottram: Monday 3rd April, 2017

Doing the same with less

The World AgriTech Innovation Summit is a great event. Start-ups, OEMs, agribusinesses and VCs all rub shoulders for two days with the intention of identifying the next big technology breakthroughs for precision agriculture. This would seem no easy task, after all, each of the entities listed above has different objectives and views on the world […]

Tractor
By Roger Burton: Thursday 9th March, 2017

Two sides of the same corn: in-soil nitrate sensing to reduce over-application of nitrogen

Up to 70% of applied nitrogen in agriculture is wasted. Integration of technology such as optical interrogation, drones and satellite imaging with agricultural equipment is showing increases in yield and decreases in operating costs. With new sensing technologies, robust implementations and intelligent data handling and analysis, it is possible to greatly reduce this wastage. Agricultural […]

fruit-picking-robot
By Niall Mottram: Monday 21st November, 2016

The Art of the Possible, but Commercially Viable

What links Donald Trump, Rethink Robotics and John Deere? At first glance not much, but dig deeper and some common themes emerge, driven by cause and effect. Let’s start with the cause. There have been acres of print and digital coverage devoted to the election result of November 8, so this blog will steer clear […]

personal-agriculture
By Roger Burton: Thursday 3rd November, 2016

Nitrate Sensing in the Soil

Artificial fertiliser has been used for more than a century to increase crop yields. It’s typically the biggest annual operational expenditure for a farmer and therefore it’s important to use it correctly. Too much and it’s not only a waste, but it can create groundwater run-off, causing eutrophication and health issues. too little and crop yield […]

soil
By Simon Jordan: Monday 31st October, 2016

Personal Agriculture

It’s been clear over the last century that farms are getting bigger. The economics of a big scale farm are better, and the risk of failure is diluted. However, the level of manpower available to do the work is spread more thinly, meaning bigger and more effective machines are needed. The drawback, however, of driving […]

agritech
By Chris Roberts: Monday 17th October, 2016

Apples vs Oranges… vs Lasers?

I gave a talk at the Agri-Tech East pollinator on Robo-Cropping last Tuesday (see slides below), and there were some really interesting contrasts at the conference. Before we went, one of my colleagues, Niall said “You’ll like this conference, they’ll be talking about using lasers to kill weeds”. I was definitely looking forward to it! One […]

Fruit farm
By Chris Roberts: Monday 10th October, 2016

Automated Harvesting – is the juice worth the squeeze?

I’m attending the Agritech East pollinator on Tuesday, all about the potential of precision robotics in agriculture. My talk is about automated harvesting, and where robotics is and isn’t relevant. It’s clear that agriculture has many tasks, currently done by humans, which are amenable to some level of automation. That human labour is becoming more expensive and […]

St-Louis
By Niall Mottram: Tuesday 30th August, 2016

A little goes a long way – precision use of resources

St Louis. The Gateway to the West. A city steeped in US history where the meandering Mississippi and Missouri rivers mark the path deep into the heart of America. And it’s here two centuries on from the Lewis and Clark Expedition that the launch-pad for another bold new chapter in the evolution of this great […]